neil-gaiman:

audreybenjaminsen:

I read Neil Gaiman’s “Ocean at the End of the Lane” this summer, and It completely got me back into reading. 

This is my interpretation of one of the “Hunger Birds,” the willfully aggressiveworld devouring varmints. When something is out of hand, or out of place, they devour.

They are the Cleaners. 

The image of them was so clear to me, that I couldn’t help but try to put it on paper. 

I also read that Focus Features will be adapting this story into a film that will be produced by Tom hanks and directed by Joe Wright. I would very much love to be a part of that. 

 

This is so beautiful, and so much like the Hunger Birds inside of my head.

(Reblogged from neil-gaiman)

elonjames:

Again. I’m not doing the writing that I should be but folks are out here collecting my words for me. It’s appreciated. 

(Source: harrysde)

(Reblogged from elonjames)
(Reblogged from benlillie)
(Reblogged from rebeccacohenart)
birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Amazing things indeed, in this lovely illustration by my friend, the amazing Rosemary Mosco.

birdandmoon:

A year ago I got to illustrate one of the endings in Ryan North’s brilliant Hamlet choose-your-own-path book To Be or Not To Be. These are all things you may be able to find outside right now (if you can bear to put down this amazing book).

Amazing things indeed, in this lovely illustration by my friend, the amazing Rosemary Mosco.

(Reblogged from birdandmoon)
Played 3,624 times

literaryjukebox:

The things we want are transformative, and we don’t know or only think we know what is on the other side of that transformation. Love, wisdom, grace, inspiration — how do you go about finding these things that are in some ways about extending the boundaries of the self into unknown territory, about becoming someone else?

[…]

The question then is how to get lost. Never to get lost is not to live, not to know how to get lost brings you to destruction, and somewhere in the terra incognita in between lies a life of discovery.

Rebecca Solnit in A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Song: “Lost” by Zöe Keating

(Reblogged from literaryjukebox)

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

Write! Goddammit.

(Reblogged from neil-gaiman)
(Reblogged from crocodileinwatertigeronland)

mo-mtn-girl:

"My lionfish research is going viral…but my name has been intentionally left out of the stories, replaced by the name of the 12-year-old daughter of my former supervisor’s best friend. The little girl did a science fair project based on my PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED DISCOVERY of lionfish living in low-salinity estuarine habitats. Her story has been picked up nationally by CBS, NPR, and CORAL magazine, and has received almost 90,000 likes on Facebook, yet my years of groundbreaking work on estuarine lionfish are being completely and intentionally ignored. At this stage in my career, this type of national exposure would be invaluable…if only my name was included in the stories. I feel like my hands are tied. Anything I say will come off as an attempt to steal a little girl’s thunder, but it’s unethical for her and her father to continue to claim the discovery of lionfish in estuaries as her own.

I’m looking towards you - my valued friends and colleagues - for suggestions on how I might be able to remedy this intentional misrepresentation without doing anything to disparage the little girl. Most of you are aware of the massive amount of time I put into exposing kids to science, and I obviously don’t want to do anything to diminish this young lady’s curiosity or enthusiasm. I’m thrilled that she chose to look at lionfish for her science fair project, but encouraging an outright lie is poor parenting and a horrible way to introduce a youngster to a career in the sciences. 

This picture was taken in 2010, when I first discovered lionfish occupying estuarine habitats - 3 years before the little girl’s “discovery” “

-Dr. Zack Jud

I pulled this directly off his Facebook page. 

I will state again that I have nothing against the little girl being so involved and excited by marine biology etc. but it’s appalling that his name isn’t even being mentioned (WAY TO GO SCIENCE JOURNALISTS). 

I don’t think many people realize how valuable this kind of recognition would be for someone who just graduated. 

To look at more of his work that pre-dates the “breakthrough discovery” of the kid go HERE

Please spread. Get this guy the recognition he deserves. 

(Reblogged from eduardo-)